Fermentation

or, Ferm Wednesday for those of you who’ll get the reference.

Yesterday was day two of my metamorphosis into an (educated) alcoholic. We began the process of making makgeolli, Korean rice wine. 

First, we washed the rice and stuck it in a blender, transforming it into a fine white powder.

We calculated our ratios, measured our ingredients,

and added boiling water until it formed a paper mache- like goo.

Then we added yeast

and dumped the unappealing mess into a plastic jug. Let the fermentation process begin.

Look what I made, mom!

And walked through a monsoon to get there. If you look close enough, you can see my name written in Korean.

Makgeolli really is nothing more than rice, water, and that crumbled up wheat block I made last class (called nurook in Korean). I spent the entire class waiting for the catch– you know, the excuse as to why I’d never be able to make this at home. I haven’t found it yet, other than I’m not Korean and it’s not whiskey. In fact, it just might be a good way to utilize some of the 20 pounds of rice collecting dust in my kitchen cabinent. If only it could be made with jalopenos.

And the best part? Our makgeolli sampler was served with a side of biology lectures- anaerobic respiration, enzymes, and CO2. Music to my ears.

Advertisements

August 19, 2010. Tags: , , , , . food, korea, rice. 1 comment.

Korean Moonshine

Last week, I found an advertisement for a first ever “Learn how to make Korean liquor” class IN ENGLISH! Somehow relates to making things in the kitchen? Check. Cool way to learn culture? Check. English? A very important check. So i registered.

It’s a four class program offered by an organization affiliated with Kyonggi University, one of the billion universities in Seoul. The class size was an intimate six- one girl from the Korean press, two Korean-Americans, and two foreigners that have done a remarkable job assimilating into Korean culture (one by marrying a Korean and the other by teaching at a university for 10 years). So that English translator they provided? Poor girl had to stand in front of the class just for me.

The first class began with samples of four different types of Korean liquor, noting such factors as taste, color, and smell.

From left to right, hahyangju, jipseonghyang, gwahaju, and cheonggamju

I swear, this really is an educational class. And fascinating, too. The four liquors shown above fall into a category of alcohol known as gayangju, or liquor brewed at home. All homemade Korean liquor consists of three different ingredients- water, yeast, and rice (of course). Each liquor we sampled had a distinct flavor, a variable of how the rice was prepared (Hahyangju uses rice cakes; jipseonghyang grinds the rice and adds water to form a batter of sorts; gwahaju is created with a rice porridge; and cheonggamju soaks rice in water for three hours until all of the liquid has been absorbed.). Our teacher detailed the traditional liquors made for each month of the year, many of which celebrate seasonal changes by incorporating fauna into the mix- Azaleas for spring, Chrysanthemums for fall…

What’s really interesting though is the resurgence in making traditional alcohol within the past twenty years or so. It was common knowledge in the “olden days” but is now a lost art due to the Japanese occupation in the early 1900s and later, the Korean War. For 36 years, Japan committed cultural genocide, destroying landmark monuments and temples, rewriting traditional songs, and burning Korean history books. When cultural practices were no longer banned, the Korean war began and rice was needed to eat as food. The knowledge of liquor making subsequently skipped a generation and could not be passed down. The liquors made today are new recipes of an old skill.

After our lecture, we set about making wheat blocks to harvest yeast. We mixed small amounts of water into ground wheat until it formed a sticky texture.

Then we packed the wheat mix into square molds

and stepped on it to give it a nice foot flavor.

Just kidding. We covered it in newspaper first. Yummm, ink. We’re trying to compact the wheat into a dense block so that it doesn’t crack when it dries out.

The finished product. The dent’s supposed to be there. It helps even out the drying process.

Apparently it takes about a month for the blocks to fully dry (I guess we’ll be getting our yeast from pre-made blocks). They’re kept at a temperature range of 30-35 C (85-95 F) for a week followed by a week of room temperatures. After that, they’re safe to leave outside, unless of course it’s monsoon season.

August 18, 2010. Tags: , , , . culture, korea, rice. 1 comment.